Do professional dog trainers use shock collars?

You ONLY wear this type of collar to keep the dog safe, NEVER to hurt him or push him into submission. The other time I wear remote collars is for the vibration function.

Do professional dog trainers use shock collars?

You ONLY wear this type of collar to keep the dog safe, NEVER to hurt him or push him into submission. The other time I wear remote collars is for the vibration function. A dog training collar should not be a punishment, but rather a deterrent to negative or unsafe behavior. The theory is that your dog will associate unwanted behavior with a slightly uncomfortable jerk and stop doing it until he no longer needs the reminder.

There are also reinforcements involved in the training of the shock collar. When the dog performs the correct behavior, the shock or vibration stops. So if you hear a shock neck trainer using the term “booster”, you can now see what they mean. However, when discharge is applied, it is a punishment that is used to reduce behavior.

One of the biggest concerns about shock collar training is that the animal does not know when the crash is coming and has no choice or power over it. Many trainers will prove that shock collars are not painful by putting them on themselves. The problem is that they have control over when the crash occurs and at what level. Take away that power and the sensation towards the crash can be very different.

There is increasing research demonstrating the effectiveness of positive reinforcement training and the risks of aversive methods. Despite this, some trainers still wear shock collars even to train simple basic obedience signals, based on several rationalizations about their greater effectiveness. We had a Cocker Spaniel rescue who was uncomfortable with all the training, but I was terrified that the word would come, even when he was happily addressing another dog in a group training class. That program must continue to be developed around positive reinforcement, even if a shock collar can help you solve a specific problem, particularly challenging and important.

A small study found that dogs respond better to positive reinforcement training than to aversive training. Latencies to respond also indicate successful training results in all three groups, with dogs starting to return to the trainer on average 1.24 s after delivery of a “Come” order and dogs complete the sitting response on average 1.64 s after a “Sit” command. Mean percentage of “Come” and “Sit” (± SE) orders obeyed after a single signal, obeyed after multiple signals (Obey+), or not obeyed for dogs trained with E-collars and both control groups. Dogs in the electronic collar group were trained according to industry best practices, evaluating the sensitivity of dogs to electronic collar settings at the beginning of training, and the training focused on associating the previous warning signal, a vibration born from the collar, with exposure to electrical stimuli.

They should not be used out of fear only as a form of communication with your dog. I only used them for remembrance purposes only and now I rarely use them only when I really have to. The misconception is that electronic collars use bullying tactics to make the dog behave a behavior, but that couldn't be more wrong. Isn't it surprising how people love to call shock collars by some other name ecollar, stimulator necklace, remote trainer, etc.

All because his previous coach just kept throwing food in his direction as a deterrent, but he didn't do anything to teach him manners? A little more money, but it's worth it, and look for a professional dog handler to show you how to use that unit correctly. The first electronic collars were introduced during the 70s, based on the psychology of shock treatment. If your dog fully expects a reward and does not get it, it is more correctly described as negative punishment. .

Esther Kaewprasert
Esther Kaewprasert

Evil internetaholic. Extreme coffee expert. Avid problem solver. Wannabe tv enthusiast. Award-winning food enthusiast. Certified social media aficionado.

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