What are the 3 d's of dog training?

The three D's are duration, distance, and distraction, and affect almost any behavior. Dogs don't generalize well, which means that if they learn to sit in front of you, they don't automatically know that “sitting” means the same thing when you're across the room.

What are the 3 d's of dog training?

The three D's are duration, distance, and distraction, and affect almost any behavior. Dogs don't generalize well, which means that if they learn to sit in front of you, they don't automatically know that “sitting” means the same thing when you're across the room. The three D's of dog training are distance, duration, and distraction. By introducing distractions, you'll initially want to decrease the duration of the behavior by rewarding and releasing more often (maybe even after each repetition), and you'll want to decrease the distance by staying close to your dog.

As you increase the distance you get away from your dog, the duration will also increase, so it is essential that your dog learns to sit for longer before attempting to address the distance. In general terms, your influence on your dog decreases as the distance between the two increases. Remembering these tips will certainly help you think like a dog and will help you stay calm when communication with your dog becomes difficult. If you haven't checked it out yet, go to Shaped By Dog Episode 21 and make sure you get your 5C download.

Generalizing behavior simply means asking your dog to perform a behavior regardless of where they are, the level of distractions nearby, or what environment they are in. As you make distractions more challenging (dropping something, getting someone else to approach, having someone else bounce or roll a ball next to your dog, squealing a toy, etc.) Dogs don't automatically assume that a given signal when you're next to them, it also applies when you're on the other side of a field. Initially, the duration of the request is very short, and you tell your dog that he can leave the position with a release signal. Taking sitting and sitting behavior as an example, you can't get away from your dog (distance), so sitting is put to good use if your dog is unable to sit or move for a period of time; likewise, you can't expect your dog to sit and stay while someone passes by cycling (distractions) if unable to sit and not move for a period of time.

Remember that dogs need a lot of help to understand that a sign such as coming or sitting, given in one situation, has the same meaning in another. Then tell her to stay, turn forward and face her or step to the other side of her before returning to the heel position and rewarding her, and so on. So your dog may be able to sit or lie down when he is fifty yards away from another dog, but he will fail this task when another dog is two feet away.

Esther Kaewprasert
Esther Kaewprasert

Evil internetaholic. Extreme coffee expert. Avid problem solver. Wannabe tv enthusiast. Award-winning food enthusiast. Certified social media aficionado.

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